Credit Balance Transfer Archives - Common Trust FCU

What Is Considered a Good Credit Score?

Highlights:

  • Credit scores are calculated using the information in your credit reports.
  • Credit scores generally range from 300 to 850.
  • Different lenders have different criteria when it comes to granting credit.

What is a Good Credit Score?


It’s an age-old question we receive, and to answer it requires that we start with the basics: What is a credit score, anyway?

Generally speaking, a credit score is a three-digit number ranging from 300 to 850. Credit scores are calculated using the information in your credit report, including your payment history; the amount of debt you have; and the length of your credit history.

There are many different scoring models, and some use other data in calculating credit scores. Credit scores are used by potential lenders and creditors, such as banks, credit card companies, or car dealerships, as one factor when deciding whether to offer you credit, like a loan or credit card. It’s one factor among many to help them determine how likely you are to pay back the money they lend.

It’s important to remember that everyone’s financial and credit situation is different, and there’s no “magic number” that may guarantee better loan rates and terms.

Although ranges vary depending on the credit scoring model, generally credit scores from 580 to 669 are considered fair; 670 to 739 are considered good; 740 to 799 are considered very good, and 800 and up are considered excellent. Higher credit scores mean you have demonstrated responsible credit behavior in the past, which may make potential lenders and creditors more confident when evaluating a request for credit.

Lenders generally see those with credit scores 670 and up as acceptable or lower-risk borrowers. Those with credit scores from 580 to 669 are generally seen as “subprime borrowers,” meaning they may find it more difficult to qualify for better loan terms. Those with lower scores – under 580 – generally fall into the “poor” credit range and may have difficulty getting credit or qualifying for better loan terms.

Different lenders have different criteria when it comes to granting credit, which may include information such as your income or other factors. That means the credit scores they accept may vary depending on that criteria.

Credit scores may differ between the three major credit bureaus (Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion) as not all creditors and lenders report to all three. Many creditors do report to all three, but you may have an account with a creditor that only reports to one, two, or none at all. In addition, there are many different scoring models available, and those scoring models may differ depending on the type of loan and lenders’ preference for certain criteria.

What Factors Impact Your Credit Score?

Here are some tried and true behaviors to keep top of mind as you begin to establish – or maintain – responsible credit behaviors:

  • Pay your bills on time, every time. This doesn’t just include credit cards – late or missed payments on other accounts, such as cell phones, may be reported to the credit bureaus, which may impact your credit scores. If you’re having trouble paying a bill, contact the lender immediately. Don’t skip payments, even if you’re disputing a bill.

 

  • Pay off your debts as quickly as you can.

 

  • Keep your credit card balance well below the limit. A higher balance compared to your credit limit may impact your credit score.

 

  • Apply for credit sparingly. Applying for multiple credit accounts within a short time period may impact your credit score.

 

  • Check your credit reports regularly. Request a free copy of your credit report and check it to make sure your personal information is correct and there is no inaccurate or incomplete account information. You’re entitled to a free copy of your credit reports every 12 months from each of the three nationwide credit bureaus by visiting www.annualcreditreport.com. By requesting a copy from one every four months, you can keep an eye on your reports year-round. Remember: checking your own credit report or credit score won’t affect your credit scores.


You can also create a myEquifax account to get six free Equifax credit reports each year. In addition, you can click “Get my free credit score” on your myEquifax dashboard to enroll in Equifax Core Credit™ for a free monthly Equifax credit report and a free monthly VantageScore® 3.0 credit score, based on Equifax data. A VantageScore is one of many types of credit scores.

If you find information you believe is inaccurate or incomplete, contact the lender or creditor. You can also file a dispute with the credit bureau that furnished the report. At Equifax, you can create a myEquifax account to file a dispute. Visit our dispute page to learn other ways you can submit a dispute.

How to Switch Credit Cards and Save Money While Doing It

We’ve all done it. You open a credit card and the rates look great at an initial glance—because you’ll never miss a payment, right? A big purchase comes around and you find yourself in a little more debt than you anticipated. That’s when your interest rate hits hard, each time increasing your already-unpayable balance to even higher levels. What should you do when credit card debt gets a little out of hand? In this blog, we’ll focus on how to successfully switch credit cards, and transfer your credit card balance, in order to both lower your interest rate and save you money.

What Are My Options?

Here is a short list of things you can do when you find yourself faced with an overwhelming balance:

  • Dip into your savings account. One way or another, the debt has to be paid or it will naturally accumulate interest via the rate you and your credit company agreed upon. This is typically the primary option since you won’t have to deal with any fees or interest rates from new loans. Understandably, however, you may not have the cash on hand to pay the balance and it’s not a practice you’d want to make a regular habit of doing.
  • Pay off the debt with a loan. This type of loan is designed to pay off your credit card debt and allow you to make payments according to a flexible repayment plan. The interest rate will be drastically lower than your credit interest rate, allowing you to pay off the principal balance much faster. That said, it’s always important to read the terms thoroughly and ask questions—some debt payoff loan promotions may have a maximum loan amount or a slew of extraneous fees.
  • Transfer the balance to a lower-rate card. This debt consolidation option is typically the most cost-efficient. But it really depends on who you choose to work with. Big banks often have low or even 0% APR offers, but they’re almost always for a limited time and change to a high-interest rate after a couple of months. By contrast, some credit unions, like Common Trust, will give you an ongoing rate that never changes, so you can rest easy and budget accordingly. The rate will be much lower than that which you are currently paying, so you’ll be able to pay off your debt quicker. Promotions can also impact the rate you’ll receive, ultimately saving you even more money.

Transferring Your Credit Balance

So, you spent too much at the annual outlet sale and found yourself in some serious debt. Time to panic, right? Wrong. While there is a bounty of debt-eliminating options you can resort to—including a Debt Payoff Loan or Debt Consolidation Loan—a balance transfer credit card is typically the smartest, safest option.

To reap the benefits of a transfer balance credit card, you’ll start by filling out a card application. As with all big steps, be sure to ask as many questions as you need to finalize your decision. Make sure to double-check that there aren’t any drastic opening or closing fees, surprise rate increases, or any other types of random costs. In order to be approved for the new card, you may be subjected to a soft inquiry credit-check to be sure you make your payments on time and aren’t a huge credit risk. The bank will then pay off your credit card company for the current balance, and in exchange, you’ll owe the same balance with a comparably-lower interest rate. It’s that simple!

Changing Future Habits

After the dust has cleared and you’ve made the final payment to your Credit Balance Transfer account, you’ll likely want to re-think the way you manage money so you avoid future debt pitfalls. Making a resolution to manage and spend better is an optimal preventative measure to any type of debt.

The key to a healthy credit score and credit report is managing your money in a productive way and staying out of debt. Try to avoid spending money that you don’t have, and keep frivolous purchases to a minimum. Doing so will allow you to keep track of balances and ensure no line of credit is getting out of hand. Don’t open too many credit cards (even if the incentive is really great)—managing multiple accounts can lead to missed or late payments and breed into skyrocketing interest balances once again. If you do have multiple accounts open, checking in with Credit Karma every once in a while will help to manage all balances and keep them in check. Though this may not be the end-all to any financial hardship, it’s a huge step in the right direction.

Struggling to keep up with credit card debt? You’re in luck! Until March 31, 2020, Common Trust is proud to be offering our Credit Card Balance Transfer promotion. With a rate of 6.99% that stays fixed until your entire balance is paid off, you can focus on paying off your principal debt balance and not worry about having to get it done in a stressful, limited time period. This offer only lasts a few months, so don’t miss your chance to live debt-free—give us a ring or reach out via email today!

5 Steps to a Debt-Free 2020

The holiday season is a great time to buy sentimental gifts for all of your family and friends. Unfortunately, this also means spending much more than you typically do during the rest of the year. After the holidays are over, you can be left with a lot of debt. With 2020 in full stride, has your debt got you down? Here are 5 steps to a debt-free future.

1. Minimize Your Spending

When debt is growing each day from high-interest rates leading to even higher balances, it can become a serious hindrance to your mental health. Try to minimize spending during this time of repayment. The more you add on to your principal balance, the more money you’ll end up having to pay in the long run. Only buy the things you need, like groceries, gas, utilities, and bills of course. If needed, try to stay away from any stores or places that may lead you to splurge. Don’t highly restrict yourself, but don’t spend frivolously either.

2. Take Advantage of a Low-Interest Loan

If your debt is getting out of hand, it may be time to consider paying it off with a lower-interest loan in order to prevent tacked-on interest payments. Since most credit cards usually rest around a 20% APR interest rate, that’s a lot to save over time. Act quickly when you realize the interest rate on your credit card is starting to rack up, and start searching for a debt payoff loan that works best for your needs. Either way, you’ll likely be paying around 10% less on a loan than in credit card fees.

3. Credit Balance Transfers Are Your Best Friend

Another quick alternative to lessen the blow of built-up debt is a Credit Card Balance Transfer. Similar in savings to a loan, this is when you transfer your higher-interest balances onto a lower-interest credit card and pay a lower rate until your balances are paid off. Over time, this solution will save you loads of money and help you make more payments on your principal balance rather than mountains of accumulating interest.

4. Save, Save, Save!

In this instance, you may not have been prepared for the oncoming holiday debt. Make it a New Year’s resolution to start saving more in preparation for big spending. It’s nice to not think about your funds when continuously swiping your credit card, but it’s even nicer to have a large nest-egg to fall back on when you’re in need. 

Open multiple savings accounts to track these goals and save up enough to shower your friends and family with the gifts they deserve. The incentive for planning ahead is a higher interest rate, meaning you’ll have even more money when the terms are up. Select the type of account that works best for you, and start stockpiling those pennies! With this easy step, you’ll be ready for any financial hardships or random splurging. 

5. Steer Clear of Future Debt

We understand how hard it is to stay out of future debt. It’s easy to grab a whole new wardrobe while scouring the racks of Nordstrom, or a funky piece of furniture at that cute antique shop on the corner. Try to build the habit of saying “no” as you move into the new year. 

If you absolutely must buy that thing, make sure you have a reputable and low-interest credit card at your side. And if you find yourself in another financial sinkhole, don’t hesitate to pay off debt with lower-interest loans before the interest starts accumulating. If you have a hard time staying true to your spending limits, try constructing a budget and sticking to it. Staying out of debt will have a long-term benefit on both your credit report and score.

Holiday debt lingering a little longer than intended? It’s time to find a solution. Our team is highly knowledgeable in financial planning and can help you get back on track. With low-interest rates and a wide variety of flexible products, a better financial future is right around the corner. Don’t let the pressure of debt bring you down – give us a ring or reach out via email today!

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